Revisiting Boredom

Way back in April, I wrote a post about how awful boredom is. At the time, there was no aspect of my life that I didn’t find boring. It’s October, and things have changed, but I’m still terribly bored at the day job. A few things have happened recently due in large part to my apathy and lack of focus that have ensured I am much more mentally present at work. Not that I’m still not hunting for a job that challenges my creative abilities.

Anyway, I’m revisiting boredom today because I came upon a topic from Linked-in that caught my attention. It wasn’t one of their standard articles (which I find hit and miss), but a forum. The topic was about the lack of boredom people face and how that translates into a lack of creativity.

Previously, I made my thoughts on boredom fairly clear: it’s malignant as far as I’m concerned. While my opinion hasn’t changed thanks to the forum, I did come to a realization. I don’t think that person was talking about boredom; I think that person was talking about downtime.

Since my courses began, and admittedly long before that, I have had next to zero downtime. Comparatively, I have been lacking on the creative front for a while. I can’t remember the last time I sat back, relaxed, and let my brain wander. I am so often in a state of angst where feel I need to be doing something or getting somewhere that I can never just be. No wonder I’m exhausted.

Years ago, one of my history professors brought this up in terms of generational thinking and practices. When he was in university, students had the opportunity to go out together after class and discuss what they’d learned–to absorb and explore it that way. Nowadays, most students have to rush to their part time job or their next class, or work on their next assignment. There’s no time to sit and think. Even as a society we’ve turned into this impatient mass that has to get somewhere as quickly as possible to get something done. It’s very mentally unhealthy.

I can’t see any time for downtime in my near future, which is a shame, but it’s something I want to stay aware of. I’m terrible at setting aside time for myself, but I’m starting to see the toll it’s taking on every facet of my life. I don’t like it.

What are your thoughts on downtime and boredom?

Boredom is Contagious, and Malignant

I don’t know about you, but I am not a person who handles boredom well. It’s slow season at the day job, and I’m out of make-work projects because I’m too efficient. This means I’ve been doing a lot of standing around lately. A lot. And I’m starting to see the toll it’s taking on my ability to focus when I want to.

Having absolutely nothing to keep me busy makes my days drag, and I find that once I’m out the office door I can’t shake off the drudgery. My feet drag 24/7. What’s worse is that I can’t figure out what to do about it.

I have a to do list a mile long, books I want to read, shows I want to watch, other things I want to do–but I’m swamped in apathy and I can’t find my motivation. Maybe it’s the heat. Maybe it’s the long days which have messed up my sleep. Maybe it’s my intense desire to find a new job. Maybe it’s my current feelings of aimlessness. Maybe it’s all of these combined and I just need to snap out of it.

Honestly, I wish typing that would cure me. Alas. I have a bit of time to myself at the start of August; it might be in my best interest to use those as vacation days from writing and to-dos so that I can truly recharge and refocus. My next school course starts at the end of this month, which is lousy timing, but I have no control over it.

When I’m done reading my current non-fiction book, I’m pulling The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People off my shelf and making some deadlines.

What do you do to rediscover your motivation? Do you find you drag in the summer or are you too busy to notice?